Amy Labourne - Drawing in August

5th August 2015

Amy Labourne - Skaw Amy Labourne - Skaw Amy Labourne will be at Sumburgh Head during August to take her turn as our Artist-in-Residence.

After many visits to Shetland, a place with constant reminders of time (both in its rich history and through the landscape itself, very little changed over hundreds of years), Aimee has recently become interested in the islands’ war ruins. In drawing these relics of the twentieth century, a time marked by ideological ruination, she uses more traditional drawing media such as watercolour, charcoal, chalk and pencil with an ethereal delicate approach, in strange contrast with the brutal architecture of the war constructions themselves. Through this, she hopes to question the romantic view of the ruin, in light of the sinister connotations of these remains of war.

Amy said "Alongside this drawing work, I use photography, moving image and recently also sound, more modern immaterial media which in today’s technology driven world are used to lead us to cinematic and immersive experiences of the ‘sublime’. In using these, I also aim to explore the technologies used in these ruins during war time. It was in remote windswept constructions such as those at Sumburgh Head that service men and women sheltered, receiving radar signals to detect a threat from beyond the horizon, using still-new technology. In experiencing these war ruins today, we can still sense this atmosphere of sinister threat. In my work, I hope to explore the ‘sublime’ qualities of war-time sites located at wild, windswept outposts in the landscape – sites which both terrify and enthral."

There will be an open studio event on Saturday 23rd August in the Education Centre where Amy will discuss her work and show what she has been working on while at Sumburgh Head.

Alongside this drawing work, I use photography, moving image and recently also sound, more modern immaterial media which in today’s technology driven world are used to lead us to cinematic and immersive experiences of the ‘sublime’. In using these, I also aim to explore the technologies used in these ruins during war time. It was in remote windswept constructions such as those at Sumburgh Head that service men and women sheltered, receiving radar signals to detect a threat from beyond the horizon, using still-new technology. In experiencing these war ruins today, we can still sense this atmosphere of sinister threat. In my work, I hope to explore the ‘sublime’ qualities of war-time sites located at wild, windswept outposts in the landscape – sites which both terrify and enthral.